The Poison Master In-Depth

dnd-lego

I know building is not always this easy. I wish it were.

Normally, I’m not much into describing build data. I’m bad and lazy at it. I also think it takes away from the organics and serendipity of designing a character.

Nothing at all against RJ Cyberware’s excellent Character Planner, but I haven’t used it for some time.

I tried using the latest version to partially assist me, I realized it wasn’t updated yet for Update 23 and the Harper tree. (I’m aware that Ron has passed the torch to a co-developer.)

But a kind person PM’ed me to detail what I’m doing with Ryncletica by specifics as I train her to be a master poisoner.

So, here goes.

Drow 32-point build, third life. Base stats:

STR: 10, DEX: 17, CON: 12 , INT: 10 , WIS: 18, CHA: 10

The high WIS is to ensure strong DCs to use finishing moves. DEX is critically important for modifiers for damage and to-hit, to, AC and Reflex. Tomes for DEX and WIS are important.

I’m sure tome bonuses are missing a bit in this, but I’m winging it here. If you can max out an ability with tomes, get them. None of Ryn’s attacks or abilities are prohibited with lower DEX or WIS, but they will be more effective.

Ryncletica is a stock Ninja Spy except in these key areas.

  • Drow racial enhancements
    • As a Drow, she gains Shuriken Expertise as a free feat, generating more stars on an average throw than in her Half-Elf past life.
    • She also gains +1 to-hit and to damage bonuses from at least 3 levels of Xen’drik Weapon Training for her shortswords (primary weapon) and shuriken.
    • Key to the poison-master build is the Update 23 changes to Venomed Blades, the same ability shared with the Rogue Assassin. Venomed Blades adds 200% to Melee Power, which aids Ninja Poison as well as any other poison damage. Both Ninja Poison and the Venomed Blades boost stacks, quickly yielding purple numbers as the poison vulnerability of Ninja Poison quickly applies.
  • Harper Agent enhancements
    • Up to +7 Melee Power points added through this tree to take advantage of the Venomed Blades boost. (This is better than my initial build calculation.) It’s a heavy AP load since the build still wants 41 AP in the Ninja Spy tree for the complete Ninja Master core ability (Vorpal, +2 DEX and +1 competency to shortsword crit threat range and +2 to bonus for shuriken threat range).
    • Several enhancements add to Universal Spell Power, which may help in general healing and damage.
    • A point of DEX comes from this training from the second core training.
  • Ninja Spy enhancements
    • Ninja Training and Advanced Ninja Training cores use DEX-to-hit and DEX-to-damage, and add a chance for an additional star to be thrown per attack (in addition to Shuriken Expertise). Ryn will be a weaker star-thrower than Shuricannon Szyncletica but far stronger than half-elf Kiricletica.
    • Only two Ninjutsu abilities are trained: Poisoned Soul and Poison Exploit. Other AP that would train the line, including Touch of Death, are ignored. Poisoned Soul injects 5 stacks of Ninja Poison on each Touch of Despair finisher. Poison Exploit rips out all Ninja Poison at 1d20 damage per stack. In training the Deadly Exploits enhancement, the Poison Exploit damage rises to 1d50 per stack…and is magnified by Venomed Blades and Melee Power for potentials of thousands of points of poison damage. Ryncletica can still deliver negative energy damage but poison is the primary death dealer.
    • With up to 20 stacks on an enemy, combined with Melee Power and Venomed Blades, a 100% poison vulnerability of Ninja Poison increases from the Venomed Blades as well as weapons with Poison enhancements. At level 11, Ryncletica still uses two of the Tiefling Assassin’s Blade, which has Wounding (CON damage that reduces Fortitude saves) and Poison (stacks with Ninja Poison effects and Venomed Blades). Any living creature gets shredded quickly by these effects. Tough enemies like duergar are easy prey with these blades and DEX-to-damage.
    • No Mercy enhancement adds an additional 30% more damage to helpless enemies.
    • Finishing Moves are central. Dark finishers can paralyze, mute or blind. These increase the speed of the poison-master’s work. Common finishers are also applied.
    • The Unyielding Strike ki attack is a quick and powerful Diversion/Bluff effect that not only helps me charge the paralyzing Freezing the Lifeblood finisher but twists enemies around very reliably, allowing me more free attacks, even against undead and elementals.
    • Shadow Double will help with burst DPS from doublestrike to deliver more poison with dual blades.
    • A little Sneak Attack is trained for prerequisites and will add some DPS when enemies are helpless, stacking with No Mercy.
  • Weaponry
    • Poison damage stacks. Some enhancements and weapons that claim to give poison damage often are stat-damaging effects and not Poison damage as a separate property as is elemental, negative energy and Force damage. Ninja Poison magnifies any Poison damage, including its own, from allied attacks (including the Poison spell) and effects.
    • The Tiefling Assassin’s Blades used have a Ruby of the Endless Night slotted, energy draining enemies while the blades have Wounding, a very useful property that damages CON (thus reducing Fortitude) and deliver Ninja Poison.
    • At level 16, two of the Envenomed Blade will be used for greater Poison damage and armor-piercing, with Paralyzing as a side benefit. The hunt is on for Shards of the Envenomed Blade to make an Epic version(s) of this weapon that will take it through to level cap.
    • The Snowstar is in use for tactical ranged fighting, but Ryn owns a few crafted stars that will deliver Ninja Poison at range (as a bug in Sting of the Ninja still  prevents named stars and challenge-crafted stars from doing this since Update 21). High DEX and Shuriken Expertise aids with faster kills with more stars per throw.
    • The hunt is on for a Quiver of Poison. This adds Poison damage to thrown weapons.
  • Feats
    • Two Weapon Fighting line. Off-hand damage is helpful here.
    • Ten Thousand Stars. Ryncletica skips Stunning Fist to add more damage with thrown weaponry. Against enemies with poison immunity, distance with damage is paramount.
    • Dodge, Mobility, Spring Attack, Combat Expertise, Whirlwind Attack. Miss-chance effects are excellent for this build. At level 11, Ryncletica uses a Green Steel helm with DEX skill bonuses and permanent Blur (20% Concealment). Dodge should be at least 25% by level 20, and Ninja Spies can use Shadow Veil for 25% Incorporeality. Combat Expertise will be trained once INT reaches 13 for an AC 10% boost. Whirlwind Attack is this build’s only tactical melee attack that can dose multiple enemies.
    • Improved Critical: Piercing for the shortswords.

It looks like my initial calculations for AP underestimated my available points. I have a few more AP for Harper.

So, 41 points minimum required to add the Ninja Spy enhancements. Bracketed numbers show total AP in the tree to that point:

  • Basic Ninja Training (core): 1 pt
  • Poisoned Soul: 2 pts
  • Stealthy: 3 pts [6]
  • Advanced Ninja Training (core, 5 AP spent, Monk level 3): 1 pt
  • Faster Sneaking: (3 ranks) 6 pts [13]
  • Sting of the Ninja (tier 3, 10 AP spent): 1 pt
  • Shadow Veil (core, 10 AP spent, Monk level 6): 1 pt
  • Unbalancing Strike (tier 2, 5 AP spent): 2 pts
  • Poison Exploit (5 AP spent): 2 pts [17]
  • Flash Bang (tier 3, 10 AP spent, 3 ranks): 3 pts
  • Sneak Attack (tier 1): 2 pts
  • No Mercy (tier 4, 20 AP spent, 3 ranks): 6 pts [28]
  • Deadly Exploits (tier 4, 20 AP spent, 3 ranks): 6 pts
  • Poisoned Darts (core, 20 AP spent, Monk level 12): 1 pt
  • Diversion (core, 30 AP spent, Monk level 18): 1 pt [36]
  • Shadow Double (tier 5, 30 AP spent): 2 pts [38]
  • Sneak Attack (tier 2, 5 AP spent): 2 pts [40]
  • Ninja Master (core, 40 AP spent, Monk level 20): 1 pt

To get maximum Venomed Blades, I needed 18 AP in the Drow enhancements:

  • Spell Resistance I (core): 1 pt
  • Xen’drik Weapon Training (tier 1): 2 pts
  • Drow Dexterity (core): 2 pts
  • Vermin Lore (tier 1): 1 pt [6]
  • Venom Lore (tier 2, 3 ranks, 5 AP spent): 3 pts
  • Xen’drik Weapon Training (tier 1): 2 pts [11]
  • Xen’drik Weapon Training (tier 2, 5 AP spent): 2 pts
  • Xen’drik Weapon Training (tier 3, 10 AP spent): 2 pts [15]
  • Venomed Blades (tier 4, 15 AP spent, 3 ranks): 3 pts [18]

The remaining 21 AP struggles to activate as much Melee Power with a few side benefits:

  • Agent of Good (core): 1 pt
  • Traveler’s Toughness (tier 1, 3 ranks): 3 pts
  • Awareness (tier 1, 3 ranks): 1 pt
  • Versatile Adept I (tier 2, 3 ranks, 5 AP spent): 3 pts
  • Harper Leadership (tier 2, 3 ranks, 5 AP spent): 3 pts [11]
  • Versatile Adept II (tier 3, 3 ranks, 10 AP spent): 3 pts [14]
  • Harper Training I (core): 2 pts [16]
  • Agent of Good II (core, level 6, 10 AP spent): 1 pt
  • Highly Skilled (tier 3, 10 AP spent, 3 ranks): 3 [20]
  • Versatile Adept III (tier 4, 20 AP spent, 3 ranks): 1 pt [21]

Challenges

Ryncletica the poison-master is intent on using Melee Power and Venomed Blades to increase her already-heavy poison damage. There’s insufficient AP available to train other Monk trees to add more passive ki regeneration, Concentration skill, or Dodge. No other enhancements outside of the Drow, Ninja Spy and Harper Agent trees can be trained.

Ryncletica must rely on only +2 total passive ki regeneration from training the Stealthy enhancement in the Ninja Spy tree and Greater/Ultimate Ocean Stance once at level 12 (at this writing, she’s 11). Since she is a melee character, ki shouldn’t be major concern as she rises in level. She may gain more ki regeneration in Epic play.

A handful of enemies are completely poison-immune. These include non-Warforged constructs, devils, demons and undead. Ryncletica will fall back to DR-bypassing weaponry, including unarmed fighting. She should hold her own, through not be exemplary in such battles, although her Drow weapon attack bonuses will make her slightly superior to other races with blade fighting.

Thankfully, enemies with high poison resistance can be weakened and overcome with enough poison, which a Ninja Spy is built to do. As with most Ninja Spies, Ryncletica is best against living, non-outsider enemies.

Ryncletica has no wand or scroll ability. She must rely on potions, clickys and her innate Monk skills for healing and other needs. Her very-strong miss-chance defenses should offset damage as her poison attacks rapidly degrade the enemy (as well as good tactics, picking when and where to fight).

Skill points are devoted to Hide and Move Silently, Concentration and Jump. What few benefits Ryn could gain from cross-class training Use Magic Device are offset by her own innate abilities or items (Blur and Invisibility are standard tools).

Ryncletica, as neither Human, Half-Elf or Shintao Monk, gains no healing amplification bonuses. She must fight carefully as battle damage is not easily and quickly restored. If any skill points aren’t used as noted above, she might consider adding them to the cross-class Heal skill for 1% positive energy spell power per point for a slight improvement to battle healing. Ryncletica’s motto is “kill fast, escape faster.” It would be interesting to contrast a double-bladed Ninja Spy like Ryn against a Tempest Ranger.

Ryncletica could retrain as a Single Weapon Fighter for much greater innate Melee Power bonuses that would allow the 11 AP in Harper Agent to be allocated elsewhere. As Kiricletica is already a SWF build, I wanted to test the TWF benefits, especially with Epic play. This is a personal preference. Ryncletica is built to maximize poison damage, not overall attack speed.

Other Equipment

Ryncletica owns an Icy Raiment that will do nicely from level 14 in most instances. She may own a White Dragonscale Robe for better AC protections.

Short of the Icys, her gear is rather off-the-shelf. I’m not going to go down this complete list as it is laughable to most, but I’ll note the highlights.

  • Icy Raiment or White Dragonscale Robe. High Dodge/AC or higher AC.
  • Nightforge Gorget: Heavy Fortification with a Deathblock augment gem combines an essential protection.
  • Jidz-Tet’ka: Still useful in mid-Heroic game as its Tri-Kreen poison helps in paralyzing while in Ocean Stance, as well as other stance benefits such as Jump in Wind Stance and healing amp in Fire Stance.
  • Green Steel DEX helm: Permanent Blur and a 2-click Displacement for emergencies.

In short: Any equipment that boosts AC and miss-chance are a plus. Any gear that increases WIS and DEX and saves are a plus. Any gear that adds Poison is a plus. Any gear that damages CON is a plus. As a melee character, increases in Fortification beyond 100% is critical as you head to Epic play.

Epic Play

I’m fond of Shadowdancer with this build for its stealthy controls, especially with high Dodge, Improved Invisibility and Shadow Manipulation.

However, the damage benefits of Primal Avatar look very attractive, particularly with abilities such as Insidious Spores, which spreads nasty Poison damage that can be amplified by Ninja Poison’s vulnerability. The Avatar’s Epic Moment, Avatar of Nature, also has a Poisoning attack that adds stacking damage that, combined with the perfected Heroic Poisoner training, should cause incredible Poison DOTs (200+ or more) per 2-3 seconds. The standard training of Rejuvenation Cocoon is also important. Primal training also adds more WIS if desired.

Grandmaster of Flowers remains a strong cross-train to improve ki regeneration and as a destiny for use in high-combat situations.

I see 150% or greater Fortification is critical to survive. Training the Unyielding Sentinel destiny and using any tricks learned from forum user and Master Assassin Nokowi to gain very high fortification will reduce the high-crit damage that Epic monsters can do.

Currently…(Updated from First Post)

Ryncletica is still doing very well. She’s getting some push-back in damage as she nears level 12. Concentrating on getting No Mercy trained and Greater Ocean Stance for more ki. Once that’s reached, a couple more Melee Power points are planned before continuing Ninja Spy training, then more Harper Agent points gradually through L16.

What Inspires You?

Protect_the_Princess

Or are you waiting for somebody else to save her because you’re still grinding for that Epic Destiny for more DPS? She’s not going to save herself, you know. (And if she does save herself, she’s not going to want you playing with her.)

Noticed that OurDDO and the DDO forums aren’t very active today.

I find that disturbing. The younger generation aren’t entirely adapting Cobainian or Meyerist philosophies, are they?

I mean, the gaming community can’t possibly be filled with players who wait to be entertained (and bitch when they think it sucks) or sit on their butts waiting for the world to change because they’re too indifferent to realize that the world requires their direct action for any change of significance to occur.

I’m older than most gamers. I’m also part of the last group of Baby Boomers (although my wife continues to try to label me as a “Generation X’er”). This gives me an insight into the past, a past where smartphones, personal computers and video games did not exist.

I’m also a big-picture person. That ability hasn’t gotten me rich or anything yet, but it does allow me to ask questions that others may not initially think of asking.

Today’s question is, as the post title asks, “What inspires you?”

I admit the question is very broad, so I’ll pop in some general directions to flesh out the idea.

What Inspires Your Builds?

As frequent readers have learned, I don’t typically solicit or adapt builds.

The closest I’ve done to adapting a build is the Shiradi Shuricannon, a build designed by someone else. Firewall noted that my build seems a little different than his original design, despite my attempts to actually replicate his build. I guess my individuality creeped into what became Szyncletica.

I tend to look at the game design and adapt a gameplay style based on a specific ability(s), class theme or game feature. My love of Monks empowers much of what I do here. They are a mystical class and I exploit that to the letter and to the role’s true nature.

Kiricletica is a generally stock Ninja Spy that leverages the stealth game mechanics. Ryncletica began my exploration into Ninja Spies, helped me define a kunoichi theme.

Syncletica favors Wind Stance while Lynncletica favored Earth. Ryncletica began to learn the benefits of Water Stance while Quintessica, back in the old days before Update 19, favored all the stances in an “Avatar” concept.

Do you find your ideas from reading the forums or blogs, or somewhere else? Do you generate your own builds? Do you share them?

What Inspires Your Gameplay?

Are you a player that simply grinds away? Do you design for power and performance or for more subtlety?

Do you even bother reading the “flavor text” of a quest? Do you appreciate or even care about the background story? I was jazzed on the “Storm Horns” quest chain and floored to see the Netherese again after enjoying them years before in a Neverwinter Nights expansion. And the wastes of Anauroch are coming to DDO soon for more Netheril antics.

The DDO forums are filled with build information. But most of these builds are based on exploiting the multiclassing options to increase combat prowess.

I’m not necessarily arguing for or against multiclassing here. I’m simply pointing out that multiclassing seems less used for anything other than increasing raw damage or sometimes defense.

Do you look at the game’s features itself to design characters? That is, look at the principles of spell power and magnify that information into a build? Or take the weakest weapon in the game and augment it to generate a powerful fighter?

Do you look at specific enemies and how to overcome them with a build or tactic?

Do you look to external sources such as TV or films? Most readers here know of my fondness towards anime and how two shows, Log Horizon and Sword Art Online, both with very different takes on the RPG game world, have inspired me to make new characters–and still do.

How about imposing conditions to your gameplay to limit what you can do to give a greater challenge? I did that with Kiricletica and her self-imposed challenge to sneak through the game with as few kills as she could.

What Do You Offer?

DDO is a game of cooperation and participation. Even if you choose to play the game completely without human players in your party, you’re still dependent on the resources of the stores to find items you may not be able to farm easily or otherwise attain at all.

Do you sell items not only for more cash for your characters, but also because you know that others may find your items useful?

If you like most of us, we often play with people we’ve come to know, either through a guild or frequent play time by association. If those friends were asked what you and your characters bring to the party, would their answer be more praise about you, the player, rather than general descriptions of your characters?

I’ll defer on what I bring to the game while I’m playing it. To-date, externally I’ve brought two game guides and this blog to reflect my thoughts on it. It’s rather self-serving to make this point on a blog post on this subject, but you see what I mean.

While not all of us can make a game guide, do you frequent the DDO forums to ask or offer advice to or from other players? Do you submit official bug reports when you find something amiss? Do you contribute to the DDO Wiki? Do you have your own blog?

Are you one of the brilliant souls that have generated respected game resources such as the DDO Character Planner or the Cannith Crafting Generator, or a smartphone app?

What do you do for your guild?

Do you help entertain, or wait to be entertained?

What Keeps You Coming Back to DDO?

As new games arrive, many players take off to spend time in those games. A few often find themselves returning to DDO. A common reason involves DDO’s versatility. The D&D character generation system is well-advanced here, with many 3.5e and 4.0 characters. Years of development have made dozens and dozens of quests and several raids. In short, DDO has more content, with more to come.

I’ve still not exhausted DDO. The world is vast and infinite. That’s not only in content, but the mechanics that give me freedom to try something new. And most of you know that I’m still playing Monks predominantly. I’ve only scratched the surface of other classes and what they have to offer.

At this rate, I’m likely to be one of the players that will be the last to switch off the lights on my drydocked guild airship when the world of DDO goes offline for the last time.

I keep writing here as a testament of the game’s inspiration to consider what I can do next with my characters. Lately, that idea’s extended into what I can do with other players, thanks to Stormreach Shadows, the stealth guide.

Far flashier games exist out there. Why are you still here, and happy to be here?

Cassietetica, the Trapmaster Ninja?

I introduced my new Monkish Rogue, Cassietetica, in an imaginary conversation with my pure Acrobat Rogue, Allysen.

Without a Rogue, you'll need an lake filled with Bactine. (Credit: www.TenTonHammer.com)

Without a Rogue, your post-quest recovery area is a lake filled with Bactine and aloe. (Credit: http://www.TenTonHammer.com)

Shortly after writing that post, I recalled my desire to be better at stealth with Ryncletica in terms of diversion. For Ryn, that’s mostly finding a cave wall near what she wants to distract, throwing a shuriken at that point, and waiting for the enemies to go investigate that noise while she sneaks past.

For Rogues with Trapmaking ability, the options grow, although it seems that very few players use these options. The reason is simple: DDO is more slanted to party-style, obliterate-everything twitchy gameplay where stealth and related tactics just aren’t done. I play solo often when not enjoying time my guildmates, so this isn’t an issue for me.

I realized that I had a special opportunity for Cassie to show how useful she can be as a mine-laying specialist.

It’s a fascinating proposal. After playing DDO for a few years now, I’m pretty familiar with what mobs will appear at specific locations of an adventure. Therefore, if I can lay traps for them (while also disabling traps that may exist), I might be able to dish out some incredible area-of-effect damage, clear mobs by the dungeon-load, and effectively loot whole adventures.

  1. Lay down traps.
  2. Lure enemies to traps
  3. Blow up enemies.
  4. Repeat.

Now, this also means that a single adventure could turn into a slower return on investment. But I’m not considering this for the speed or even the experience points, but just to see how conniving, how devious a Rogue can be in destroying enemies by hardly raising her weapon.

Trap Types

DDO Wiki has a good article on trapmaking that’s the basis for my interest.

To make certain traps, you need enough trap parts you scavenge as you disable traps throughout the game. Fair enough. You recycle trap materials to make your own traps.

The trap I expect to use most often isn’t quite a trap. It’s a noisemaker. I can set it and, in a few seconds, it makes a sound that should attract enemies to it while I shuffle away in the opposite direction. This is what Ryn would love to have in soloing “The Claw of Vulkoor” to lure scorpions away in the process of completing ting the quest without being detected. However, making traps requires the Trapmaking feat auto-granted to Rogues at level 4, so Monks can’t build or use noisemakers without multiclassing some Rogue levels.

While Rogues can farm for many trap part types (such as mechanical parts from blade traps and the like), they’re limited to creating elemental and magical traps. (Sad that we can’t set up our own spinning blade traps o’ death.)

The promising news is that such traps come in various degrees of damage, commensurate with the number of parts and other ingredients you have on hand and the Rogue level necessary to set that trap.

Better: Rogues can set traps with damage that can’t always be saved against by most mobs, such as Force and Sonic.

By level 11, a Rogue should be able to make Force and Sonic mines that have a huge area-of-effect with 50d6 damage. Oh, let me just fill a room with these. Mines auto-deactivate after 2 minutes 30 seconds, so there’s time to lay a nice field of these babies in front of a door or hallway and let the bastards stumble through.

But you can see the challenge here, however. You need parts to make traps. Lots and lots and lots of parts. That’s going to take a lot of quest grinding where traps are abundant. Thankfully, DDO provides me with many places to farm for the Force and Sonic parts I’d like, as well as mechanical parts.

A Ninja Trapmaster

Ninja_crouchTo help in parts farming, I can make Cassie a Rogue Mechanic.

She’ll has a better shot of gathering more parts per disabled trap. They also get better DCs to use them, increasing the likelihood that enemies will suffer greatly for her skills.

But I also wanted to add Ninja Spy I to Cassie, too. I didn’t realize that you can select more than one Prestige Enhancement on a multiclassed character: 1 Prestige per class, not character.

So, it should be possible to add Rogue Mechanic I and Mechanic II to Cassie to improve her trapmaking and trap-laying skills.

Additionally, I can add a little Ninja training for shortsword ability and Shadow Fade (ki-powered invisibility/incorporeality) to have a Rogue 14/Monk 6. Shadowdancer Epic Destiny will be perfect for her later, and she’ll have enough Monk levels for Grandmaster of Flowers training, too.

But can I swing all the Mechanic enhancement prerequisites (I’ll need them anyway to compensate for lost Rogue skill points from the Monk levels) as well as the Ninja Spy I prerequisites? It’s a lot to do.

I reset my enhancements a day or so ago to try out the possibilities and started picking. The enhancements work out just fine for both Prestiges with a few points to spare.

Some might ask, “Why not Assassin training?”

It’s a good question. I’d still gain some parts, but going full Mechanic doubles the chance for more trap parts versus an ordinary Rogue. She’ll also set traps (and detonation packs) faster than others. Setting traps for this build is just as important as disabling them. Going Mechanic also leaves me an emergency ranged option as well, using repeating crossbows.

An Assassin build does sound tempting, yes. But somehow I see Cassie as less…temperamental than other Rogues. Must be that monastic training. She kills because she has to do so, not because she wants to do so. Still, if I wanted to go down that grim, woefully powerful road, it’s just a matter of resetting enhancements.

Honestly–there is plenty of slaying in DDO. Somehow, I’ve never been that bloodthirsty. I’m more of a fan of counting coup. It”s something that Ryncletica does a lot. She gains personal favor in defeating her enemies by circumventing every defense they have to complete an objective. Rather than obliterating an enemy’s army, Ryncletica obliterates their honor. Ryn and Cassie rarely start fights, but they will always finish them.

Cassie’s stats are going to be difficult. Normally, WIS is a dump stat for a Rogue. But she’ll need a bit to make her Monk DCs work and her ki to be sufficient for attacks. She’ll certainly have high concentration on her DEX for AC and reflex saves but needs good Fortitude and Will saves, too. She can’t rely on her stuns. She won’t gain Abundant Step, so somersaulting to get to trap control boxes will require awesome saves. Thus, Dodge/Incorporeality/Concealment numbers will be essential. STR is also vital; that’s why Allysen has weak DPS. Cassie, by hook or crook, needs a minimum 24 STR by level 20, I think.

So, there you have it. A Rogue with dark Monk fighting skills, who is also a Ninja and trapmaster.

Stay tuned. This is going to be a fun build to generate.

I need to think of a good build name, however. “Ninja Trapmaster” doesn’t quite roll off the tongue.

In related fun, TenTonHammer has an older but well-written article on why DDO Rogues are true Rogues in comparison to other MMO games.