A Cautionary Tale of L-Shroud Part 4

Mericletica5Our most excellent multi-guild raid team took on a Legendary Shroud on Hard recently.

We should be old hats at this. But L-Shroud has a deceptive quality. Most of us have played Heroic-level Shroud many, many times before. So the familiar surroundings of L-Shroud, I suspect, causes some of us to let our guard down.

That’s a very bad thing to do in any part, but especially in Part 1, where the troglodytes that appear are all very dangerous. The sorcerers disintegrate. The fighters critically hit you with one strike, and so do the assassins. In this part, we break off two or three people to guard the portal beater’s backs. That’s a difficult job since the trash spawns at the portal as well as behind the team. And most of our player defenses on Legendary are much weaker.

For some reason this night, our DPS on portal beating was OK but you could tell it wasn’t our best. We complete Parts 1, 2 and 3 without much fuss.

It’s Part 4 that I worry about most now in Legendary Shroud.

The fight is exactly the same as in the Heroic version. Devils show up with a few friends to off you. After a time, Arraetrikos appears for the first time.

And this is where sub-par DPS will end your raid–and also why a solo Legendary run is nearly impossible.

Optimally, you kill Harry in one pass, else he returns with gnolls that heal him. In Legendary, the eight gnolls will heal Harry back from 1/4 HP to full health in less than 30 seconds. And the gnolls are hardy bastards; only one or two adventurers cannot destroy them fast enough. You need to devote the whole party to remove them fast, then switch over to Harry and peel back more HP on him.

But Harry is also being Harry, throwing fireballs and slapping adventurers hither and yon, killing a few. After a consecutive Ten Thousand Stars and Manyshot volley to his face, Harry often turns his attention to me and spins meteors to my face, which will sting a bit, even with high Reflex saves, without some PRR.

That’s typically the point where your party is doomed, especially if your DPS was only adequate but not superior. One or two adventurers with only one or two death penalties may be OK, but once 5 or more in your party have suffered 3 or more deaths, their performance and HP are greatly reduced, increasing the chance for others to die and all but ensuring that Harry will triumph.

So, to those a little new to L-Shroud, here’s a tip or two for what its worth.

  1. Check your party DPS before entering. A full party is less important than a party that can rid the floor of portals and have the power to hurt Harry (or the gnolls) situationally. Not that I fault our raid party here (we love to have everyone play) but players under level 25 in the party probably hurt our chances that night.
  2. Ensure people have their portal-beaters and Harry beaters as well as any fortification bypassing. The simple portal-beater isn’t enough, in my opinion. You need to reduce the portal’s (and L-Harry’s) fortification to do similar damage to him as in Heroic. My Pynthetica the Zen Archer is designed to excel in both categories thanks to a strong weapon (a Complete Thunder-Forged Longbow that punches Force damage) but also because she can reach 85% fortification bypass thanks to Precision (25%), the bow’s armor-piercing (35%), the Grandmaster of Flowers ED Piercing Clarity (10%) and, by level 30, the Shadowdancer ED Grim Precision (15%). I swap in +5 Holy Arrows, kick on Ten Thousand Stars and go to town. It shouldn’t be a terrible option for most to switch to crafted Armor-Piercing gloves to help. And player abilities that also reduce fortification as a group (the Monk’s Jade Strike, or the Deepwood Stalker’s Mark of the Hunter) also help.
  3. Depending on your group, determine your Part 4 strategy. Normally the strategy is simple: Kill Harry, rapidly and in one go. But be ready with a Plan B: Slowing or killing the gnolls before turning your attention to Harry. Here, Paracleta’s superior Legendary-level paralysis helped a few times when Harry didn’t go down on the first try. She paralyzed two gnolls, leaving only six to destroy and buying time for the party. The trick here is that you MUST paralyze or otherwise freeze the gnolls before they emit their healing beam, as they materialize in the arena. That beam does not stop once started unless the gnoll is dead or the beam hasn’t started to begin with. Flesh-to-Stone, Otto’s Dancing or other effects could work if you get the save and if you’re very fast. If you have paralyzers in your party (and not Heroic level paralysis: You’re going to need to have a DC of 60+ to stand a chance), this can make the difference.
  4. Remind the party to go for maximum everything on the first attempt. Use boosts, the right weapon, throw spells carelessly. Definitely hit him with anything that lowers fortification for yourself or the party. Hold nothing back. It’s got to be “one and done” or the gnolls await you.

Got any other tips to share from your raid experience? Just drop them in the comments.

The Efficient Gamer

Ryn4Being an older gamer (“When I was your age, we played with 8-bits…and we LIKED IT!) I’m not as keen as jumping on the bandwagon of some other new game. I have been tempted to try out WoW just to see what the fuss was about.

My new job (yay!) consists of three or four 12-hour work days. The advantage of that is a LOT of days off to decompress, sleep and catch up on work.

This new routine has reduced my DDO time a bit, because, as my guild’s prime rule says, “real life comes first.”

That doesn’t mean I’m not playing at least two to three hours per week. Still doing the same things, just a bit slower.

Pynthetica is nearing 29 once more as a Zen Archer. I’m looking into improving this build once more, as I might have noted, by checking out other races and classes. My last task from a gear standpoint is (1) craft up level 30-ish items that are optimally placed (WIS, DEX) so to allow use of named items, replacing some loot-gen items that aren’t in good spots; (2) Complete a Legendary Shroud and craft up ingredients to make my Legendary Green Steel Mineral Longbow with “You Cannot Evade Me”: an augment that spikes Insightful DEX by 1d8+2 for 20 seconds and causes 1d8+2 Dexterity damage. Apropos for the ever-evading Zen Archer, do you think?

Paracleta, my very successful Zen Bowmaster, finally has her Complete Thunder-Forged Longbow. Being a first-lifer, I’ll possibly eTR her first and burn Shiradi karma for a Doubleshot 3% bonus to bring her ultimate standing Doubleshot to 74% with gear but before any use of Ten Thousand Stars or Manyshot, which sends her Doubleshot to as high as 241%. I should begin work on her Legendary Green Steel Longbow, too. Once back at level 30, it’ll be back to a regular Heroic True Reincarnation to play around with some things. Paracleta was built as a counter-attack to comments about the Zen Archer. As serendipity would have it, she found a very strong niche. This character will have a long and very dangerous life.

I’d love to get more time in on Ryncletica, my third build, the Poison Master. She’s incredibly dangerous with her DPS and poison damage but could use some offensive adjustments over several areas. The great thing about her is that she’s effective at any level because of her build design. Time to play with other races, although this may reduce a little poison damage and require feats I get for free as a Drow. She’s also lacking powerful Thunder-Forged weapons, but her innate speed and damage is already good. Defense is the central need for the Poison Master.

Lynncletica has proven herself as a very versatile tank over many raids. There’s little more she can be, so I may never TR her again, reserving her as a contingency tank for raids that lack one. We’ll see. Meanwhile, new Dragonborn Shintao Scythetica may be filling in as I test this race with Shintao training.

Been thinking of how to improve Szyncletica, my old original Shuricannon. I should look at Firewall’s Shuricannon 2.0 notes and integrate them into her next life. Meanwhile she’s working on a Thunder-Forged shuriken since Pyn, Paracleta and Lynn are done with their many “Deathwyrm” raid rotations. Like Pyn, Szyn is desperately in need for optimizing her gear, so she’s aiding that being the central contributor of loot-gen gear to be crunched into Cannith essences for my crafter to use and grow.

With the Update 33 changes, I’d also want to revisit some older ideas. One that fell by the wayside with the enhancement tree introduction was the “Avatar” build that leverages the strengths of each and every Monk stance. Now that the Monk stances are themselves augmented yet again and with improvements (and more personal experience with) Epic Destinies, I might be able to take one of my characters through such a development.

And then there’s the recent changes that have made stealth (and, in the case of Rogues, assassination) that make this ability much more hazardous to use. I still have my solo-stealth master, Kiricletica, to study how to augment stealth skills against a dungeon that, on sensing you, truly alerts whole squads at you. Can a ninja still use their disappearance and stealth skills to escape reliably?

Thanks for still coming by to read, although I cannot post as often as I’d like.

Zen Archery and Returning Again and Again

archer

I’ve been mostly re-leveling Pynthetica. She completed a run as a new Monk archer build, the Shadowbow Ninja (great damage) and is now back as a Zen Archer with her second Epic True Resurrection.

On Pyn’s first eTR, the larger problem was finding and using all the lower level equipment. Not the bows: I had several good ones, especially the free Unwavering Ardency (from the 10th Anniversary Party) that’s more than powerful enough until you can wield a Pinion. I simply wanted useful goggles, boots, trinkets and the like.

Cannith Crafting to the rescue. Update 32’s revised features really helped customize new tools that supported normal and Insightful bonuses for any items. Most importantly, anything I made with bound shards is bound-to-account, making storage of the items easier by transferring them to my bank characters as I TR.

By finally getting my crafting level up to level 29 or so right now, Pyn’s equipped with Tendon Slice and Armor Piercing bonuses, Insightful Dodge and ability scores. Fortification was the only thing I couldn’t swing in, so I had to use some older Heroic items to keep it (and Deathblock) in place until I reached level 25 or so. On return to level 28 (where the bulk of my best gear is usable at minimum level), the central crafted items may be the goggles (WIS/Insightful WIS for maximum Ranged Power and AC), boots (Dodge/Insightful Dodge), gloves (DEX/Insightful DEX, Tendon Slice) and perhaps bracers as a wild card (Resistance). The necklace slot is also up for grabs as the Epic Golden Guile is less useful now, but I have no idea what to add. Same is true for perhaps one ring.

As to what Epic Past Life feats I choose? Doubleshot and Fortification. I wanted a quick 2nd Doubleshot feat after epic life #2 but I was impatient in rebuilding that karma back in the Primal tree. I’ll grab that second Doubleshot stack (3% per stack, maximum 3 stacks) on another eTR.

Changes with Updates 33 and Improved Deception did affect the Zen Archer build with mostly positives than negative. For one, more Dodge and stacking maximum Dodge with the Monk stance adjustments, so Pyn has around 38% Dodge (with items) in Water stance. But what the stances gave, it also took away by moving the critical threat multiplier from Earth stance to Fire stance. As Fire stance is rather WIS-lowering and gives no benefits while in ranged attack, the Zen Archer would only go to Earth stance for a little more PRR now. Wind stance remains only useful for a DEX boost and gives no other benefit for a ranged (as opposed to thrown) weapon user.

The bluff spinning effect that Improved Deception created was defined as a bug with Update 34, so that’s gone. More challenging is the aggro change in shooting one enemy in or near a group of others, which aggros the entire group. For me, I’ve adjusted my gameplay to use height and barriers that restrict a mob’s ability to bum-rush my party. I still use two or three hirelings (thanks for the extra kitty, SSG) in solo play to grab the aggro first when practical.

When there’s nothing to slow down a zerg attack, I ramp up my own. The Zen Archer still has potent damage per target with all of its Ranged Power and the ability to use Ten Thousand Stars and Manyshot to improve attack speed and Ranged Power. She may not be using Improved Precise Shot (she’s a sniper) but she takes down single enemies so rapidly that the change isn’t particularly bad. (I am considering, as you should, adding IPS as an option for faster clearing as one of my last Epic feats, since the aggro change can work against you.)

Combined with the right bow, mobs of 10 or more are killed rapidly. Add in a few uses of Shiradi talents such as Otto’s Whistler and Pin and smaller groups are easily managed.

The Zen Archer’s talent to stand and defeat armies of enemy archers remains very good. With the extra Dodge in Water stance, it’s better. No other ranged/thrown weapons character I know of could stand toe-to-toe against the gnolls in Epic “Chains of Flame” without losing 3/4 of their HP or worse. With all her defenses up, Pyn might lose 1/8 of her HP.

So, I’m considered the new Racial Reincarnation options. As an Elf, Pyn could work to get that extra +1 DEX and Action Point. But frankly, I see this new option as a bit underwhelming, especially since the price of using Racial Reincarnation works like a Heroic True Reincarnation (favor, flags, quest completions reset, empty your TR cache). That’s a lot of sacrifice for a little gain. And Racial Reincarnation is mutually exclusive to other reincarnations. You can’t make both a Racial and Heroic/Epic TR at the same time.

 

The Dragonborn Monk: I Like It!

Please oh please or please let me make one as beautifully deadly as this one

I’ve not played D&D tabletop. But the addition of Dragonborn (unlike the Gnomes, except for their dancing and appearance, which are awesome) is a great one for Update 35, released today.

For starters, it’s the first reptilian player character. Second, it’s a fsckinDRAGON.

Most importantly, it fills in some important variations for Shintao players.

The race gets +2 STR, -2 DEX and +2 CHA. Decent base advantages for the Shintao tanker. The racial tree (at least based on the information as presented on the Lammania server) is also balanced well between being a strong fighter or mage. In short, it seems you cannot go wrong in either option. This obviously makes sense for a dragon race.

The look is also impressive. Hopefully the females don’t have bewbage (as the “female” Warforged do not, although the illustration does) as a weirdness. The appearance looks menacing yet curiously inviting. I’m looking forward to the character appearance variations in the character generation. A Dragonborn with lipstick and hair (!?) would be amusing.

Being a Human all the time to get (at least) no racial advantage or disadvantage, save more healing amplification, was boring. While Dragonborn only have a little innate racial amp, the Shintao itself gives plenty, and you get an inherently tougher race with innate Natural Armor and PRR bonuses. I know you could also go Half-Elf–but they are so butt-ugly as characters.

That said, I’m totally going to roll one up at my earliest opportunity. For raids such as those in Thunderholme and the new raid that comes with this new update, a dragon fighting a dragon should be a nice change of pace.

And my continued experimentation with UMD is also made easier with this race as a natural spellcaster.

Edited: Corrected base stats.

The Shintao Guardian

portrait-lynncletica1Hi, all.

In real-life news, I just received a job offer. No more potential as a real-life mendicant. That news lets me relax just a little before my job prep to get a long-requested build to you.

As I mentioned before, I’ve been using Lynncletica, my Little Mountain Shintao Monk, as a very successful and potent tank in nearly 35 Deathwyrm runs (all difficulties) and several other raids.

In Legendary Hound of Xoriat, Lynncletica easily held aggro on Zyzzy and her puplings with Ki Shout and an effective 105 Intimidate in an Legendary Normal run. She was doing fine in Legendary Hard but has yet to complete. That’s a tough challenge even with a prepared party with great coordination, and you don’t win raids alone.

So what makes her special? Not too much. It’s time to share that.

  • Fortification: Unyielding Sentinel is the central tanking destiny. With a +70 Insightful Fortification helm, Brace for Impact, and the Outfit of the Celestial Guardian, Lynn sits at 286% to 315% Fortification.
  • Miss-chance: 27% Dodge, 10% Incorporeal with an item, 20-25% Concealment. All with gear but Blur can be done through the Wind/Light/Wind Monk finishing move.
  • AC: Improved Combat Expertise, Combat Expertise, Ultimate Earth Stance and other gear for around 138 to 158 AC based on buffs and gear.
  • PRR: 158 to 180. This really absorbs a lot of damage combined with the usual Monk abilities in effect.
  • HP: Around 1200-1400. She can take several hits without flinching.
  • Healing amplification: 180-270. Typical 180 when tanking to maximize defense. Can use Healing Ki for 400+ HP heal every 10 seconds. Rejuvenation Cocoon also improved. These numbers make for 400-600 HP from a Cure Light Wounds spell.
  • Concentration skill: 101-105. Ki Shout makes this the Intimidation skill with solid aggro and threat generation from Earth Stance and Unyielding Sentinel. What’s mine stays mine.

Lynn’s gear at level 30 isn’t particularly special. Her design leverages more STR (2:1 ratio). at 50 STR to 24 DEX to optimize damage but gain some Reflex saves and AC. Feats that add PRR or damage absorption improve durability in fights. With a bit of juggling of special buffs and gear, Lynn can briefly reach 75 STR needed for levers in Legendary Elite Tempest’s Spine.

CON is the highest stat at 55 base, as Monks gain only 75% HP per level as others. But this works well as high CON and Insightful CON items are worn.

For Epic feats, I chose Guardian Angel, Elusive Target and Epic Damage Reduction to soak or avoid additional damage. Dire Charge helps offensively for aggro control. The Legendary feat I chose was Scion of Limbo. Monks are used to one-minute buffs, and the many variations possible were all positive ones, either augmenting defense or offensive regularly without me having to do anything. You could also consider other Legendary feats to give a fixed defensive or offensive bonus.

With handwraps such as Storm’s Harness, Epic Scraps of Enlightenment and now some Complete Thunder-Forged Handwraps with Mortal Fear, Lynn’s innate metal-bypass has no problem hurting what she needs to hurt and well. Stunning Fist is available with a high WIS item switch-out, bringing the ability to a useable level, boosting AC a bit. However, raids rarely allow you to stun much.

The general gear list includes things that primarily enhance defense. These items may be merged or adjusted using Cannith Crafting or other items.

I didn’t add the Twists to the build. I strongly recommend Rejuvenation Cocoon and Brace for Impact (If not in Unyielding Sentinel) no matter what else you select. Enlightenment from Grandmaster of Flowers is good. Also, Standing with Stone for more stacking PRR while in Earth Stance. Improved Combat Expertise from Legendary Dreadnaught adds more PRR.

Like many builds, there’s much flexibility in what you take, just as long you don’t remove much of the special damage reduction or HP benefits. Adjusting WIS and DEX to lower levels will impact AC and saves. Naturally, use Yugoloth favor potions and DDO Store elixirs for added power.

Attached is a PDF file of the build. (WordPress has limitations for what I can upload.) Open the file using Adobe Reader or other PDF reader, copy the text and paste it into a text editor such as Notepad and save it as ShintaoGuardian.txt. You should be able to import the text file directly in Character Builder Lite to adjust as you see fit.

Shintao-Guardian

 

Real Life Debuff

databank_forcelightning_01_169_b1eb5a6f

As if unemployment could really feel like this. It’s worse.

As noted in past posts, I’m still in the game but sporadically. Unemployment still plagues my family, so real-life comes first before all other things, obviously. My Concentration score has to be higher in front of my computer than within it as an avatar. My game skills are insufficient as wage-earning.

I did frighten a few friends by rolling up a Gnome wizard a week or so ago, just to keep them on their toes. They thought I’d lost my mind.

If there are any topics you’d like me to address in future posts, do comment with suggestions.

A Mighty Love: “Neverwinter Nights”

By luck on Facebook, there was an ad that mentioned a free download of a game for 48 hours. The site, GOG (used to be known as “Good Old Games”) hosts that and many other PC games from relative antiquity.

neverwinter-nights

One of the desktop promo shots, showing the lovely, poised and eventually traitorous Aribeth de Tylmarande. 

This game, however, I could not resist downloading. It was “Neverwinter Nights,” the original 2002 Bioware game. This was the “Diamond” release, which included the original campaign, the first expansion, “Shadows of Undrentide,” and the last major expansion, “Hordes of the Underdark.” It also included three smaller modules I could not play on my Mac as they were released for the Windows code base only.

Lord knows how many times I’ve actually purchased the game for both platforms. So I saw this free opportunity to download it for Windows play as a blessing. Too bad I didn’t think of switching to Mac mode to download the Mac binaries at the time. At least I know where to get it. On second thought, the NWN Mac port, unless rewritten, will not work with current Mac OS versions because the software engine requires compatibility tools long since removed from Mac OS. So given that my iMac is mostly in Boot Camp (native Windows) mode 90% of the time, the Windows version was a better plan.

NWN was the game I began to play as my “Diablo II” high finally began to recede. It was my first venture into D&D official game mechanics and campaigns (several attempts to enjoy the original “Baldur’s Gate” ended with crushing confusion and failure).

Because hope springs eternal for me, I even had saved my “localvault” character saves folder. Thankfully the character files are text-based files that worked fine if switched between the Mac and PC clients. And now I can copy the installer to a USB stick so I’ll never lose the damn media again.

The Campaigns

Everything I learned about basic D&D mechanics I first learned from NWN. That’s especially true for the Monk, of which I played a lot. No surprise there for you.

NWN was a single-player game that supported player-based campaigns with larger parties, as well as even a Dungeonmaster driven campaign. I rarely tried to go multiplayer; at the time I wasn’t inclined to try them after the cluster-frakking I experienced in “Diablo II” multiplayer mode, with player killing rampant and cheating abundant.

nwn_shieldguardian

Shield Guardians. These guys were beautiful.

NWN used the D&D 3rd Edition ruleset for much of its foundation. It’s this design that gave me enough confidence to enjoy a sequel game, “Neverwinter Nights 2” and then to buy the Monk class on joining DDO–without playing a single second in-game.

One thing that DDO could still improve is its opening tutorial quest. The  Original Campaign begins by you, an adventurer out to help the city of Neverwinter, besieged by a plague, in the Neverwinter Academy, a training building for all classes.

The tutorial allows you to experiment and understand all elements of movement, camera, combat and spell casting very quickly I became very comfortable with the rules and mechanics quickly.

soh-charactersht

The Character Sheet looks more familiar now than ever. This is in an elven crypt in “Shadows of Undrentide.” Great graphics for its time (if you had a PC that supported them).

Like DDO, NWN has a great dialogue engine with PCs. Unlike DDO, NWN allows Evil-aligned player characters and presents dialogue responses that reflect your choice. Also, non-player characters improve or adjusted your alignment, which is measured from 0 to 100 based on your actions. So if you entered with a Lawful Neutral character, continually rescuing people that you could otherwise leave alone will eventually change you to Good aligned. Attempting to kill certain people, especially if innocent, will send you down the Chaotic and Evil paths.

You can move your player character (PC) using the WASD keys but the mouse option to click a spot ahead to move your character was much more natural. I missed this.

NWN also supported henchmen, the counterpart to hirelings. Much like our DDO brethren, you had limits on the number of them in your party, you could adjust their combat and other behaviors, and there were various classes you could select to complement your PC class. While the original campaign did not support adjusting the inventory of the henchmen, the two major expansions did, allowing you to really trick out your guys to meet every need. All three games also allowed romance or deeper relationships (with loot often as a reward) by chatting more with your henchmen or other NPCs.

hotu-combat

Aribeth joins my NWN incarnation of Lynncletica in a curb-stomp battle against dozens and dozens of devil minions.

NWN allowed you to boost the game’s difficulty as well so that care had to be taken for area-of-effect spells that could hurt yourself or the party if carelessly used, or to make enemies deal far higher damage to you than normal, similar to Epic Elite nastiness.

The original campaign is pleasantly long, allows you to pause the game and save as you desire, and provided all the D&D pleasantness as you chose.

The first expansion, “Shadows of Undrentide” (SOU) could be played with a new character or with one you imported from an original campaign. This campaign introduced kobolds (in particular, a notably fun NPC named Deekin, who could join you as a henchmen in the second expansion). SOU told of a mysterious attempt to find the ancient ruins of the floating cities of ancient Netheril and return one into the sky.

Does that sound familiar? It should. These floating cities were powered by D&D’s magical plutonium, mythallar. You saw a big ball of it used to fly a glacier as a war platform in the quest “What Goes Up.” My NWN experience helped me prepare for the dangerous mages we find in DDO.

The second and last major campaign was “Hordes of the Underdark” (HOTU). You can also import a level 15 character or higher (new characters get XP boosted to reach 15 if desired). This expansion loosely connects your PC as the same that completes SOU (neither expansion sees your original campaign character as connected to the their events) so you’ll already have a reputation as a hero that gets stuff done. In HOTU you’re also reunited with the Original Campaign’s henchmen.

hotu-battle-1

HOTU was remarkable for throwing you into the city of Waterdeep, besieged (since when is a city not besieged when you show up?) by the Drow of the Underdark, under the leadership of a matron mother self-appointed as the “Valsharess”, or “Queen”. Taking advantage of a sudden and unexplained disappearance of the goddess Lolth (maybe Ana Brabener decided to take her butt out), the Drow society is thrown into chaos and new factions are formed.

To discover the mystery behind the Drow attack, you’re tasked with discovering why the buffer zone of Undermountain, a series of dungeons-from-hell maintained by the crazy wizard Halaster, is allowing the Drow to pass from the Underdark through Undermountain to the surface.

HOTU allows Epic characters up to level 40. You can choose to continue leveling in your class (so a level 40 Monk can happen) or you can add in prestige classes very similar to our Epic Destinies, such as Shadowdancer, Assassin (evil Rogues only), Champion of Torm, Purple Dragon Knight and so on.

hotu-feats-2

Leveling in all three campaigns is familiar enough with skill points and feats that are similarly named with similar functions. With my DDO Monk experience, however, I’m amused by differences in NWN Monk feats over their DDO counterparts. One, “Empty Body” gives you 50% Concealment in NWN–a very powerful defense because there isn’t a countering power in NWN to bypass concealment.

hotu-feats-1

Another feat at level 20 gave you immunity from mind-affecting spells, something I’d love to see in DDO where not for the fact that DDO reflects the NWN importance of high saves and spell resistance to ward off such things.

hotu-endgame

The Underdark is filled with the usual denizens and a small pack of good-aligned Drow that you assist. But more sinister forces held by the Valsharess are moving everyone around like chess pieces for an endgame that will lead you face to face with a king of the hells with no tolerance for heroes and a tendency to turn your henchmen into enemies.

Still a Great Buy

I’ve never played D&D tabletop, but thanks to my enjoyment and experience from DDO and NWN, I’m much more likely to try it someday. Just so happens there’s an annual gaming convention in my town when I’m ready to dive in.

The complete 2002 Neverwinter Nights game with expansions and 3 modules is only $10 from GoG.com. You’ll also find “Neverwinter Nights 2,” another enjoyable adventure with a sequel or two on the site. You should be able to ramp up the graphic settings to their maximums for full enjoyment.

Why not give yourself a old-school Christmas present?

 

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